Meet the marketing specialists promoting advice firms

In the second part of our new series, we meet the marketing specialists in financial services. Whether battling competition or simply telling the public you exist, engaging campaigns and standout client communications can make all the difference

In the second part of our new series looking at the staff across advice businesses, we meet the marketing specialists in financial services.

Whether battling competition or simply telling the public you exist, engaging campaigns and standout client communications can make all the difference. 

You can see the first part of our series, featuring conversation with business managers, here. 

In the second part of our new series looking at the staff across advice businesses, we meet the marketing specialists in financial services.

Whether battling competition or simply telling the public you exist, engaging campaigns and standout client communications can make all the difference. 

You can see the first part of our series, featuring conversation with business managers, here. 

Emer Tilson

Head of marketing, 1825

What led you to this role?

I had the opportunity to join the 1825 team as a result of a maternity leave vacancy. I jumped at the chance, as I had previous experience in the setup and ongoing running of new businesses.

What is the importance of this role at advice firms?

The financial planning and advice profession is an extremely competitive sector, and it is therefore important to stand out from other companies. Successful marketing can help us connect with our clients and create a loyal client base, but this can be difficult to achieve. It is not just about the data, research and insight. You have to talk to the clients too.

What are your duties?

I am responsible for leading the marketing team and supporting the growth of 1825. I am accountable for developing and running engagement programs, attracting new clients, rebranding acquired businesses and ensuring the marketing strategy is aligned to 1825’s business strategy.

How have you developed the business and what are your plans for the future?

A clearly defined brand is crucial, and we communicate this through the content we produce. We actively engage clients and prospects with a strong brand message and the content to back it up. We have also developed our research and insight capabilities and use data not just to measure the success of a campaign, but to evolve the next.

What are your top marketing tips for advice firms?

The role of marketing in advice and planning firms is changing. There was a time when marketing existed solely to support sales. Now the role of marketing is expanding to reach prospects directly and clearly define how they offer solutions in a non-salesy way. The goal is to provide high-quality client experiences, attract new prospects and build brand awareness.

Hannah Price

Marketing director, Wealth design

What led you to this role?

For the past decade my marketing specialism has been working with financial advisers. Last year, the directors at Wealth Design and I started discussing setting up a marketing and training company, Wealth Design Marketing, as an extension of the group. It was a natural evolution.

What is the importance of this role at advice firms?

For Wealth Design, the focus this year is delivering client excellence. We are running a client event, launching a portal, and focusing on our client segmentation.

One of my IFA clients wants to reduce its bought-in leads, so we are working on building more leads through its website. Another firm’s priority is creating more client touch-points that add value to their experience.

What are your duties?

For Wealth Design, my duties involve setting up client meet-the-fund-manager events, developing and analysing annual client questionnaires, working with the directors on our client proposition and creating quarterly newsletters and social media posts. I need to ensure the brand image is consistent and conveyed in everything we do, ranging from the tone of voice in their communications to the experience in the office.

How have you developed the business and what are your plans for the future?

Mapping out the client experience has been key. This year we are adding a number of innovations to further enhance this. Once bedded in, we can look at growing our client base and focus more on generational involvement.

Hannah Thorp

Marketing executive, Addidi

What led you to this role?

I actually started my career in music marketing, but left when I was asked to compromise my morals. At just 22, I had spent most of my life with music as my primary focus, so it took me a few years to readjust that vision. The one thing I knew was I had a real passion for marketing and learning how to influence others, and I wanted to put that to good use. I found my home when I met Anna Sofat, founder of Addidi.

What is the importance of this role at advice firms?

Marketing at advice firms is important. You have a responsibility to educate as well as promote your business. At Addidi, we have taken a content-based approach where we talk about issues within the industry and share opinions on current affairs.

What are your duties?

My main duty is to create and implement the Addidi marketing strategy, ensuring the ethos and messaging is amplified as much as possible. I achieve this through a number of methods: networking, campaigns and researching.

How have you developed the business and what are your plans for the future?

Last year we embarked on a rebranding process which included a fresh, new website and the launch of Addidi’s biggest campaign yet: The Voice of Women’s Wealth. We then continued to amplify the message by launching an industry initiative earlier this year when we published a manifesto, Change the Culture of Wealth.

We will continue to provide a service that takes care of women and their families by empowering them to take ownership of their finances.

What are your top marketing tips for advice firms?

Stay away from fear selling. We all know fear is a great motivator, and people are fearful of what they do not know or understand. However, by putting people at the heart of your business, you will find much longer and rewarding relationships. It also makes it easier to sleep at night.

Faith Liversedge

Director, FL | Storyteller

What led you to this role?

I started my career in journalism, but I struggled to live in London on a graduate journalist’s wage with no particular area of specialism to drive me forward.

I wanted to move into financial services marketing because I thought it would offer bigger projects. After a while, I found my groove and realised I particularly enjoyed the challenge of making financial services marketing more creative and engaging.

What is the importance of this role at advice firms?

As so many aspects of the advice process become commoditised and price-pressure increases, advisers have to explain where they add value. If everyone sells similar products, you have to give people a reason to choose you. The good news is demand for good financial advice is high, so in some ways, the hard work has already been done.

What are your duties?

I follow a structured process. It begins with a detailed strategy session where I discuss what works and what does not, and find out what the history of the business is and its goals. I combine this with detailed customer research, which often reveals the most surprising information.

At certain points, I bring in talented web developers, graphic designers and search engine optimisation professionals to create the finished piece.

How have you developed the business and what are your plans for the future?

I am constantly developing my proposition as I speak to more and more advisers and clients. My plans for the future are to help more firms with quick fixes. I understand how busy they are and how marketing can often fall to the bottom of their to-do list.

Websites do not have to take months to create. I would rather help people get their message out there with a quick and simple website than leave them struggling to tinker with something that may no longer be fit for purpose by the time it is finished. They could be missing out on new business in that time.

What are your top marketing tips for advice firms?

Be specific about who you are marketing to before you start. Do not be afraid to develop a niche rather than trying to be all things to all people.

Start with your website and give it a good going over with the viewpoint of your ideal client. Is it really speaking to them? Would you want to work with you? If the answers to those questions are ‘no’ then get in touch with me.

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